Em Roblin featured as a Woman of Influence in the SHE ERA in RAYLI Magazine

Em Roblin was honored to be recognized as an Influencer in the She Era by RayLi Magazine and featured in their Special 25th Anniversary Edition.


RAYLI (Chinese: 瑞丽) is a monthly fashion magazine catering to affluent urban women in their twenties and thirties. To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the magazine and honor the progress of Chinese women, they set 'SHE ERA' as the theme and recognized top influencers paving the way in this era.

They describe the SHE ERA as one where women:

  • never stop pursuing self-value and power,

  • Don't try to please others, and instead follow their vision and live with confidence,

  • Lead lives of full independence: economic independence, personality independence and spiritual independence,

  • Are bold, brave with free shining spirits that inspire others.


Some other's recognized and featured in the magazine's edition include:

  • Yang Lan, Chinese TV host, media entrepreneur and philanthropist

  • Liu Wen, Founder of Chinese cosmetic brand, Tendril Inquiry

  • Si Wen, Leading female standup comedian in China

  • Chen Yejin, Chairperson of RAYLI Magazine, who discussed the role of men in this era and highlights the role of the magazine in empowering young women


Here is a translation of the interview:

I want to say: (highlighted quote)

" Because I believe in myself that I believe in you. It's because I love myself that I love you."

INCLUSIVE SHE ERA

In an inclusive world, we feel like we belong but we also recognize that each individual brings something unique. We all win when we can leverage our uniqueness.

1. How do you maintain enthusiasm through creating Inner Circles and maintaining its operations?

Em: The first thing is I have a beautiful vision of the world I am contributing to create. In my vision, I'm contributing to a world that is truly inclusive where everybody feels a sense of belonging and they are also connected to who they are. So, when I wake up each day no matter I'm running or delivering a program or a meeting or working with somebody one to one, I am super connected to how all of it contributes to that vision.

My energy comes from the inside out –there is a pure, honest, genuine passion that comes from a deep place in my heart.

Another thing that’s important is to take care of myself. So, I'm super aware of my mental, emotional and physical health whether it's through sleep, diet, exercise, meditation, making sure I nurture that part of me so that when I am busy and doing all the different things and all the different roles that I play in my life, I can really bring - bring it all.

2. You must have worked with many business leaders. What are the differences between male and female leaders?

Em: Well, I know that's a very hot question and one people love to ask. I'm hesitant to say that, you know, men are a certain way and women are a certain way. The longer I do this work, (it's been over a decade that I'm deep into this work), I think I'm even less likely to put women into any kind of a box to declare women should possess any particular qualities or responsibilities, etc.

I will say, though, that in my experience, many women who are conventionally successful find that they need to suppress part of themselves in order to really thrive in the career path that they're on. And that causes disconnection - where women disconnect from who they really are. So, a lot of times when I sit with a woman for the first time – and I really see her, I really hear her, I really value her for who she truly is, she may feel uncomfortable with it at first. Learning to shine from the inside out requires a different mindset and skill set than seeking external validation. Women are really strong. I have worked with thousands of women in China.

Chinese women are resilient, holding an unstoppable power that gives me so much hope for what's coming for Chinese women in the future.

And, I'm delighted to see inclusion gaining traction. Whether we are talking about it in our organizations, in our schools, in our institutions, the need to create spaces where people can be themselves, bring their best, and contribute their unique experiences and ideas is becoming more understood. We are on the journey. And the results of all that, well, it benefits everyone.


3. What are the biggest challenges faced by contemporary professional women in your contact with them for so many years? What is your guidance on this issue?

Em: A lot of the work I do through designing and creating experiences for women is to press pause from the super, super busy lives that we are living, where we are all carrying so many roles and we are moving so fast. Because when we can press pause and look inside, we can connect to the unique, authentic power that we each already hold. We can find new sources of energy, internal sources, and find ways to let that shine.

Many women have spent time and energy focusing on what they think they should do, who they should be, who they think they need to be.

Focused on external milestones – they can often feel not good enough, feel a struggle to get to the next level, to get that promotion, buy that new home, etc. But as many discover, it’s not as meaningful or fulfilling as they may have expected.

I'm thinking of one example that comes to my mind. You know, there was a really bright woman leader who recently attended one of my experiences. I asked her on the first day when she entered into the program, why are you here? And she said, "Well but it's so obvious why I'm here. I'm here because I'm struggling. I'm struggling as a Mom after my second baby, I'm struggling because I have a new promotion at work that I don't feel like I'm competent enough or experienced enough to handle. I'm just struggling."

I looked at her with just nothing but love and belief that she's a beautiful human being with so many capabilities that she doesn't even know she has yet. We went through the experience together and a couple of months went by. To watch this woman really give herself permission to sit down and think about who she is, what her life is about, how she can shine in each role she plays and to connect her internal energy source. At the end of the program I asked her, why are you here? And she said, "I'm here because I’m committed and capable of having a full life." She felt grateful for her family, grateful for her job, and she could see the opportunities she had to drive positive change. She left the program so full of clarity and energy, feeling able to take on MORE than she could have ever imagined, when just months before, she had felt underwater. It's beautiful.

It can take a lot of courage to walk your own path - to craft a life that’s designed for us to bring out or best. But the great thing is that it's a journey that starts the moment you think it's important.

4. You are the mother of three children and have your own career. How do you combine work with family and life?

A: I think one of the things I do that's really important is I enroll my children into understanding the work that I do. So, you know, my youngest daughter, she's 3 years old and she knows when Mum isn't home it's because she's doing something she really cares about that makes a difference. So, when I’m away, I will call checking in and l’ll ask, "Hey, how are you getting ready for school?" And she will also ask me, "Mum, whose life will you change today? Who are you sharing your love with, Mum?" She will ask me these things and she's enrolled in understanding why the work I do is so important.

I feel like as a Mum, that's the best gift I can give to my children is to model living a full life, full of love, authentic to who I am. It's a gift.

I think another thing that's really important in my family is to be present. So, it's not just about what I do or how I support my children, it's about who I be so that when I'm with my kids, I'm 100% there for a period of time. If we're going to play, let's play. I fully invest in that moment and give my fullest attention and appreciation and they can feel that. So, in those times when I'm not there, we're still connected, they feel loved.

And the last thing I'll say and this is a really important piece is I have a lot of honest conversations. Whether it's a conversation with my husband or my children or at work about how we’re doing, what’s working and what isn’t, making small shifts as we go to get better. These are ongoing, and critical.

5. What kind of era do you think 'SHE ERA' is?

A: I feel like there's a great recognition and an increasing awareness among all people, men and women of different generations, that the voice of women, the presence of women, is something that really needs to be encouraged and celebrated. In an inclusive world, we feel like we belong but we also recognize that each individual brings something unique. The SHE ERA feels like that to me – like it’s time that women bring ourselves forward – we’re ready for that. The world is ready for that. And it will inspire others to do the same.

The journey to truly shine your unique light is – well a journey. And the SHE ERA is showing us that it’s time. That the space is growing for women to step up and bring their authentic light into this world. It is a journey but start now. Start now because, it is welcomed. Your voice. That unique voice that only you can fill. It's time to bring it forth.

What a beautiful thing.

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For 15 years, Em Roblin has been passionately creating experiences that empower people to grow into better leaders, partners, colleagues, parents, friends, etc. Thousands of people have gone through her programs which cultivate authenticity, connect people to their humanity, awaken new possibility and inspire positive change. Follow Em on Linked In or reach out to her directly through a personal message to learn more about how to work with Em one to one or through one of her programs.


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